Course Contents

Childhood and Development Years

 

Course objectives: Marks: 100 (80 + 20)

The student teachers will be able to:

  • Understand the meaning, nature and scope of educational psychology
  • Describe the role of educational psychology in teaching and learning process
  • Understand growth and development of the learner and its importance in the learning process (with special reference to childhood and adolescent stage)
  • Understand the needs, problems and developmental tasks of adolescence
  • Describe intra and inter individual differences
  • Explain the causes of individual differences
  • Identify characteristics and remedial measures for diverse learners
  • Identify educational needs of various types of children
  • Understand role of teacher in school to minimize individual differences
  • Explain the concept of motivation, role of school and teacher to enhance motivation
  • Understand concept of intelligence, theories of intelligence and their educational implications
  • Describe the concept, characteristics of creativity and educational programmes for developing creativity
  • Explain concept, types, theories of personality and ways of assessment of personality
  • Identify factors which affect mental health and hygiene and measures used to promote mental health
  • Understand factors affecting adjustment and role of teacher

UNIT 1: Child Development

  • Educational Psychology: Meaning, Nature, Scope and Role of Educational Psychology in Teaching-Learning Process.
  • Concept of Growth, Maturation and Development.
  • Principles of Growth and Development.
  • Heredity and Environment: Concept, Importance of Heredity and Environment in Child’s Development.

 

Unit 2: Managing Individual Differences

  • Individual Differences: Meaning, Dimensions (Cognitive Abilities, Interest, aptitude, Creativity, Personality, Emotions, Values, Attitudes, Study Habits, Psycho-motor Skills, Self-concept and Gender).
  • Causes of Individual Differences (Race, Sex, Heredity, Social, Economic Status, Culture, Rural-Urban Home, Language Spoken and Language of Instruction).
  • Characteristics, Identification and Remedial Measures for diverse learners (Creative, Slow, Gifted Learners, Learners with Specific Learning Disabilities).
  • Role of Teacher to minimize Individual Differences.

Unit 3: Social, Emotional and Moral Development

  • Social Development: Meaning, Stages and Factors affecting Social Development, Characteristics of Social Development during Childhood and Adolescence.
  • Emotional Development: Meaning, Factors affecting Emotional Development, Characteristics of Emotional Development during Childhood and Adolescence.
  • Moral Development: Meaning, Stages (Kohlberg), Factors affecting Moral Development, Characteristics of Moral Development during Childhood and Adolescence.
  • Childhood and Adolescence: Meaning, Characteristics, Developmental Task of Adolescents, Problems of Adolescence Period.

UNIT 4: Cognitive and Personality Development

  • Cognitive Development: Meaning, Factors affecting Cognitive Development, Characteristics of Cognitive Development during Childhood and Adolescence.
  • Theories of Cognitive Development (Piaget and Bruner).
  • Personality Development: Meaning, Factors affecting Personality, Development al Stages of Personality( Views of Sigmund Freud and Allport)
  • Adjustment: Meaning, Types and Factors affecting Adjustment, Symptoms of Maladjustment and Role of the Teacher.

Activities (Any one of the following)

  • Prepare a report of administration and interpretation of any one psychological test, selecting one from: Personality/Adjustment/Mental Health.
  • Visit to a school and write a report on problems being faced by the students
  • Administration of an individual test and preparing a report.

Suggested Readings

Aggarwal, J.C (1994) Essentials of Educational Psychology, New Delhi : Vikas Publishing House

Berk, L.E (2012) Child Development (6th Ed .) New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India,

Bhatnagar,S. (1980). Psychological Foundations of Teaching Learning and Development, Meerut: Loyal Book Depot

Chauhan, S.S (2006) Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi :Vikas Publishing House.

Craig J Grace (1983) Human Development, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, INC, Eagle Wood Cliffe,.

Dash, M. (2000), Education of Exceptional Children, New Delhi : Atlantic Publishers and

Distributors.

Deceecco, John P. and Crawford, William, R. (1988), Psychology of Learning and Instructions, New Delhi : Prentice Hall.

Devas, R.P., Jaya N. (1984).A Text Book on Child Development, Bombay: McMillan India Ltd.

Dinkmeyer.C.D(1967) Child Development, New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd.

Duric, L (1990)Educational Psychology, New Delhi : Sterling Publishers.

Entwistle, N.J.(1981). Styles of learning and teaching, New York :John Wiley.

Entwistle, N.J.(1987). Understanding classroom learning, London: Hodder & Straughton.

Feldman (2011) Discovering The Life Span, New Delhi: Pearson Education

Gates, A.S and Jersild, A.T (1970) Educational Psychology, New York :Macmillian.

Hilgad, E.R. And Bower, G.H., (1977). Theories of Learning, New Delhi :Prentice Hall of India Ltd.

Jangira, N.K., etal (1991). Functional Assessment Guide, New Delhi : NCERT.

Joyce, Bruce and Marsha Wali., (1985) Model of Teaching, New Delhi : Prentice Hall of India, Mangal, S.K (1997) Advanced Educational Psychology ,New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India

Maslow, A.H. (1970), Motivation and Personality, ( 2nd Ed.), New York: Harper & Row.

Mathur.S.S(2007) Educational Psychology, Agra: Vinod Pustak Mandir

Panda, K.C. (2001)Education of Exceptional Children, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

Penuington, D, et.al (2010) Advanced Psychology: Child Development, Perspectives and Methods, London: Hodder &Stoughton

Reilly, P.R & Levis, E (1983) Educational Psychology, New York : Macmillian Publishing Co Ltd.

Robert A Baron(2012) Fundamentals of Social Psychology, New Delhi: Pearson Education

Rothestein, P. R. (1990). Educational Psychology, New York: McGraw Hills

SaminaBano (2012) Experimental Psychology, New Delhi: Pearson Education

Umadevi, M.R.,(2009) Educational Psychology: Theories and Strategies for Learning and Instruction, Bangalore: Sathkruthi Publications

Wheldall, Kevin (2006). Developments in Educational Psychology, New York: Routledge

Woolfolk, Anita (2004), Educational Psychology, (9th ed.) India: Pearson Education

Witting A F,(2001) Developmental Psychology: A life span Approach, New Delhi: Mc. Graw Hill

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D & E. Section A will consist of 8 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 16 marks. Sections B, C, D & E will have two long answer type questions from the respective Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the syllabus and carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B, C, D and E of the question paper and entire Section A is compulsory. Answer to short questions should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper II

Contemporary India and Education

Marks: 100 (80 + 20)

Course objectives:

The student teachers will be able to:

  1. Understand the Constitutional Provisions for Education in India.
  2. Understand the Fundamental Rights, Duties and Directive Principles of the State Policy.
  3. Understand the aims of Education as per Constitutional Values.
  4. Develop competencies to understand the various issues related to Education and remedial measures.
  5. Understand the Constitutional provisions for inequality, discrimination and marginalization in UEE
  6. Realize the importance of Right to Education and the provision made for realizing it.
  7. Understand the importance of Education for the marginalized groups.
  8. Acquaint with the policy initiatives, educational policies and programme in Contemporary India.
  9. Acquaint with the emerging concerns and Educational development in India.

Unit –I: Education and the Indian Constitution

Indian Constitution: Preamble, Rights and Duties, Directive Principles of the State Policy and Aims of Education as per Constitutional Values; Constitutional Provisions for Education: Article 14, 15, 21A, 45, 46 and 51A (K).

Unit –II: Inequality, Discrimination and Marginalization in Universalization of Education

  1. Equality of Educational Opportunities: Meaning, Objectives and Scope
  2. Discrimination: Meaning, Factors and Constitutional Safeguards
  3. Right to Education: Historical Development, Provisions, Issues and Challenges in Implementation.
  4. Education of the Marginalized Groups (Women and Socially Disadvantaged) : Status, Issues and Constitutional Provisions.

Unit –III: Policy Initiatives for Universalization of Elementary Education

  1. Kothari Commission (1964-66) and NPE (1986, 1992) and Recommendations for UEE.
  2. Operation Black Board: Concept and Provision
  3. DPEP and SSA: Objectives, Provisions, Implementation and Evaluation.
  4. MDM: Objectives, Implementation and Problems

Unit –IV: Emerging Concerns and Education

  1. Education for Environmental Conservation: Global Environmental Crises, Local Environmental Issues, Steps for Environmental Conservation and Regeneration.
  2. Liberalization, Globalization and Privatization and their Impact on Indian Education
  3. Social Basis of Education in the Context of Society, Culture and Modernity
  4. Community Participation and Educational Development

Activities (Any One of the following)

  1. Presentation on various National Educational Policies.
  2. Preparation of reports on the State and Centrally Sponsored Schemes of Education like SSA, RMSA, MDM.
  3. Conduct surveys on Educational problems at school level.

REFERENCES

Aggarwal J.C.(1984). Implementation of the Major Recommendations of the Education Commission 1964-66 and The New Pattern of Education India: New Delhi: Arya Book Depot.

Bhakshi P.M., (1998). The Constitution of India, New Delhi: Universal Law Publishing Company,

Bakshi, P.M. Basu, (2010). Constitution of India (2nd ed.) Delhi: Universal law Publishing Co.

The Constitution of India Bare Act (2010). Delhi: Universal law Publishing Co.

Raval, K.C., (2010). Bharatiya Bandharan, Ahmedabad; S.B.D. Publication

Jain, M. P. (2010). Constitutional Law of India, Delhi: Universal Law Publishing Co.

Shukla, V. N. (1996). Constitution of India, Delhi;: Prentice Hall of India.

Govt. of India (1986). National Policy of Education, MHRD, New Delhi.

Govt. of India (1992). Programme of Action (NPE). MHRD, New Delhi.

Jayapalan, N. (2002): problems of Indian Education, Delhi: H.B. Bhargava Publications.

NCERT (1986). School Education in India- Present Status and Future Needs, New Delhi: NCERT Publication.

Jan Oostoek, Barry K.Gills (2013). The Globalization of Environmental Crisis. NewYork: Routledge, Publication.

Chandra Ramesh, (2004). Globalisation, Liberalisation, Privatisation and Indian Polity: Education. Delhi: Isha books Publication.

Frank R. Pfetsch, Christoph Rohloff (2013). National and International Conflicts, 1945-1995: New Empirical. NewYork : Routledge, Publication.

Tiwari ,Shubha (2007). Education in India. New Delhi: Atlanta Publication.

Websites

DPEP (india.gov.in/my.../district-primary-education-programme-dpep)

DPEP ( www.educationforallinindia.com/page81.html)

SSA (ssa.nic.in/)

SSA (mhrd.gov.in/?q=sarva)

MDM(mdm.nic.in/)

MDM(mhrd.gov.in/?q=mid)

MDM (www.archive.india.gov.in/sectors/education/index.php?id=7 External link)

RMSA(www.rmsaindia.org/ External link)

RMSA(mhrd.gov.in/?q=rmsa)

RMSA ( indiacode.nic.in>coiweb)

Constitution of India ( www.amagon.in>introduction_constitution)

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D & E. Section A will consist of 8 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 16 marks. Sections B, C, D and E will have two long answer type questions from the respective Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the syllabus & carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B, C, D and E of the question paper and entire Section A is compulsory. Answer to short questions should be completed in around 100 words each.


 

Paper III

LANGUAGE ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

Course Objectives:

The student teachers will be able to:

1). Understand the nature, importance and use of Language.

2). Acquaint with some latest methods and approaches for planning of successful language teaching.

3). Identify and be sensitive to the proficiency, interests and needs of learners.

4). Practice learner centered methods and techniques in the classroom.

5). Use technology to enrich language teaching.

6). Encourage continuous professional development.

UNIT 1 - LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY

  • Meaning , Nature and Scope of Language, Role of Language in life: Intellectual, Emotional, Social, Literary and Cultural Development
  • Characteristics of Language Development
  • Factors affecting Language Learning : Physical, Psychological and Social
  • Theories of Language: Divine Gift Theory, The Pooh or The Interjectional Theory, The Ding-Dong Theory, The Yo-He-Ho- Theory, The sing- song Theory, The Ta-Ta Theory, The Babble- Luck Theory, The Tongue-Tie Theory, The Contact Theory.

Unit 2: CURRICULAR PROVISIONS, POLICIES FOR LANGUAGE EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF LANGUAGE SKILLS:

  • Position of Languages in India; Articles 343-351, 350A; of Constitution of India
  • Kothari Commission (1964-66); NPE-1986; POA-1992; National Curriculum Framework-2005 (Language Education), NCFTE - 2009 (Language Education).
  • Meaning, Importance and Need for development of Language Skills.
  • Approaches to Language Learning: Traditional Method, Textbook Method Communicative Method, Grammar-cum-Translation Method, Principles and Maxims of Language Learning

 

Activities (Any One of the following):

Discuss ‘Multilingualism as a Resource’

Analyze s advertisements aired on Radio/Television on the basis of language and gender.

Analyze few passages from Science, Social Science and Maths textbooks of Classes VI to VII and Write a Report based on Following Issues

(i) How the different registers of language have been introduced?

(ii) Does the language clearly convey the meaning of the topic being discussed?

(iii) Is the language learner-friendly?

(iv) Is the language too technical?

(v) Does it help in language learning?

SUGGESTED READINGS

Valdmen,(1987) Trends in Language Teaching, New York, London: Mac Graw Hill.

Johnson, K (1983): Communicative Syllabus Design and Methodology, Oxford: Pergamon press.

Mukale, JC. (1998): Approaches to English Language Teaching, New Delhi: Sterling PublishingHouse,.

Palmer, Harold E.(2014): The Principles of Language Study, New York: World book company, Sharma, KL.(2012) : Methods of Teaching English in India, Agra, lakshmi Narain Agarwal Publisher.

Varghese, Paul: Teaching of English in India, University of London.

Kohli, A.L: Techniques of Teaching English, New Delhi: Dhanpat Rai Publisher.

Geeta Rai (2010): Teaching of English, Meerut: R. LAL book DEPOT.

Praveen Sharma (2008): Teaching of English language, Delhi: Shipra Publications.

Joseph Mukalel C. (2011): Teaching of English Language, New Delhi: Discovering Publishing House.

Sharma Yogendra K. , Sharma Madhulika (2011): Teaching of English Language, New Delhi: Kanishka Publishers, Distributors.

Sharma R.A. (2007): Teaching of English Education, Meerut: A. Lall Book Depot.

Sharma Asha (2010): Teaching of English Education, Ludhiana: Vijaya Publications.

Mangal, U.(2010) Teaching of Hindi, New Delhi: Arya Book Dept.

National Curriculum Frame Work (2005), New Delhi: NCERT.

Sachdeva, M.S (2013) Teaching of English, Patiala: Twenty First Century Publications.

Sullivan, M. (2008) Lessons for Guided Writing. Scholastic. National Curriculum Frame Work (2005).

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Section A will consist of 4 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 8 marks. Sections B and C will have two long answer type questions from the respective units 1 and 2 of the syllabus and will carry 16 marks each.

 

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B and C of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short question should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper IV

Understanding Disciplines and Subjects

Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

Course objectives:

The student teachers will be able to:

  1. Understand the nature of discipline and school subjects
  2. Differentiate between school subjects and curriculum.
  3. Integrate and apply concepts and theories in real classrooms.

UNIT-1: Concept of Discipline

Nature and role of Discipline knowledge in School Curriculum

Paradigm shift in the nature of discipline

Emergence of School subjects and disciplines from Philosophical, Social and Political Contexts.

Needed changes in the Discipline Oriented Text Books

UNIT-2: Quality in Classroom Learning

Indicators of Quality Learning

Teaching and Learning as Interactive Process

Major issues in classroom learning: Catering individual differences, student-teacher interaction in the classroom.

Learning beyond text books- other sources of learning

Activity (Any one of the following)

  1. Prepare a report mentioning the changes required in current school level text books prescribed by CBSE or HPBSE.
  2. Prepare a report highlighting major issues and concerns in teaching of Mathematics or English at secondary school stage.

SUGGESTED READINGS

Apple, M. (1978) : Ideology and Curriculum, New York: Routledge.

Fuller, B. (2007) : Standardised Childhood, Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press.

Romero-Little, M.E. (2006). Honoring Our Own: Rethinking Indigenous Languages and Literary. Anthropology and Education quarterly, 37(4), 399-402.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Section A will consist of 4 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 8 marks. Sections B and C will have two long answer type questions from the respective units 1 and 2 of the syllabus and will carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B and C of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short question should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper V

TEXT READING AND REFLECTIONS

Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

Course objectives:

The student teachers will be able to:

1). Learn to read Newspaper ,Follow Radio, TV & Internet media critically and with understanding.

2). Form and exchange viewpoints on political and social Issues.

3). Distinguish fact, fiction and opinion in Newspaper articles.

4). Develop teachers professionally and support their aspirations as teachers.

UNIT-I: Analytical and Critical Thinking

Analytical and Critical Thinking: Meaning and Importance for Reading and Writing.

Role of Critical Reading and Critical Thinking in Enhancing Writing Skills.

Ways of Developing Reading Skills: Importance of Developing Reading Skills; Reading Aloud and Silent Reading; Extensive Reading; Study Skills including using Thesauras, Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

Ways of developing Writing Skills: Formal and Informal Writing (such as Poetry, Short Story, Letter, Diary, Notices, Articles, Reports, Dialogue, Speech and Advertisement.

UNIT-II: Pedagogies of Reading and Writing

Models of Teaching, Models for Assessing the components of Reading (Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, and Text Comprehension).

Instructional Approaches for Developing Students’ Concepts of Grammar, Punctuation, Spelling and Handwriting.

Responding to the Texts: Approach to Response Based Study (The Core of the Text, Personal Connection, Reading Beyond the Text, Revisiting the Text).

Responding to the Contexts: Sharing Responses (Purpose of Sharing, Role of the Teacher and Benefits of Sharing).

ACTIVITIES (Any one of the following):

  1. Writing a review or a summary of the text with comments and opinion.
  2. Student teacher will select news paper/magazine articles on topics of contemporary issues
  3. REFLECTION EXERCISES:
  • Why did this particular (event, barrier, success, accident) happen ?
  • What was the best thing I did and Why?
  • If I did this again tomorrow, what would I do differently?

SUGGESTED READINGS

Alberta Learning (2003), Responding to Text and Context, Senior High School English Language Arts Guide to Implementation. Alberta, Canada. Retrieved from https://education.alberta.ca/media/883678/4_respond.pdf.

Cottrell Stella (2011) Critical Thinking Skills: Developing Effective Analysis and Argument (Palgrave study skills) Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Cox, Ailsa (2005) Writing Short Stories (English) London: Rutledge.

Fisher Alec (2001) Critical Thinking: An Introduction, UK: Cambridge University press.

Fitikides T.J., (2011) Common Mistakes in English (With Exercises), New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.

Gangal J.K (2011) A Practical Course for Developing Writing Skills in English, New Delhi: PHD. Amargan bookseller.

Hedge Tricia (2005) writing- Resource Book for Teachers. http://chabotcollege.edu/learningconnection/ctl/figs/jumpstart/marsipacket.pdf.

Jeanne Godfrey (2014) Ready and Making Notes Pocket Study Skills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Joshi, Yateendra (2003) Communicating in Style, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.

Julia Copus (2009) Brilliant Writing Tips for Students, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kale William (2012) Reflective Writing, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Peter Andrew Goatly,Preet Hiradhar (2013). Critical Reading and Writing:An Introductory Coursebook(Google eBook). Routledge, Language Arts & Disciplines.

Ryder, Randall. J. (1994) Using Frames to Promote Critical Writing, Journal of Reading,38(03): 210-218, Wiley Publisher.

Schraw, Gregory (1998). Promoting General Meta-cognitive Awareness.Instructional Science 26: 113–125, 1998. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Netherlands. Retrieved from http://wiki.biologyscholars.org/@api/deki/files/87/=schraw1998-meta.pdf PDF File  (file not found).

Sen. Madhucchanda (2010) An Introduction to Critical Thinking, Delhi: Pearson Publication.(www.goodreads.com>book>show>/)

Stephen D. Brook fied (2009) Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher, Jossey Ban.

Swami Srikanta . & (2006) Management strategies for Developing Critical Thinking skills, New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

Thompson, Anne (2008) Critical Reasoning : A Practical Introduction. London: Routledge.

Thomson, Arco (2003) How to Write Articles for Newspapers and Magazines, New Delhi: Jain Book Agency.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Section A will consist of 4 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 8 marks. Sections B and C will have two long answer type questions from the respective units 1 and 2 of the syllabus and will carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B and C of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short question should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper VI

Learning and Teaching

 

Course objectives: Marks: 100 (80 + 20)

The student teachers will be able to:

  • Understand the nature, characteristics of learner and principles to make teaching-learning effective and productive
  • Explain the concept, nature of learning as a process and conditions of learning
  • Describe the Gagne’s types of learning
  • Explain the concept, types and strategies to develop memory
  • Understand nature, causes, factors and strategies to minimize forgetting
  • Apply the knowledge and understanding of the learning process, principles and theories of learning with their educational implications.
  • Describe the concept, importance and level of transfer of learning
  • Explain higher mental processes like concept formation and mind mapping
  • Explain the role of teacher in teaching-learning situations as transmitter of knowledge
  • Understand concept, principles of teaching, levels and phases of teaching
  • Identify different learning styles of learners and their implications for the teaching
  • Understand need and types of models of teaching

 

Unit 1 Learner and Learning

  • Changing Nature of Learner, Characteristics of Effective Learner, Guiding Principles to make Teaching-Learning Effective and Productive, Characteristics of Student with Learning Disabilities
  • Concept and Nature of Learning as a Process, Learning Curve, Conditions of Learning - objective, subjective and methodological, Learning and Maturation. Learning as an outcome -Achievement and Performance.
  • Gagne’s Types of Learning, Events of Instruction, Learning Outcome.
  • Memory - Concept, Types and Strategies to develop Memory; Forgetting - Nature, Theories (Interference Theory, Trace Change Theory, Forgetting as Retrieval Failure), Factors and Strategies to Minimize Forgetting

 

Unit II : Understanding the Learning Process

  • Learning: Meaning, Types and Levels of Concept Development, Strategies for Concept Learning
  • Non-associative Learning- Habituation and Sensitization, Learning through Association –Classical Conditioning, Learning through Consequences – Operant Conditioning, Learning through Trial and Error, Learning through Observation – Modeling/Observational Learning, Learning through Insight – Discovery Learning and their Educational Implications
  • Social Constructivist Learning – Concept of Vygotsky, Nature and Implications.
  • Transfer of Learning: Concept, Types and Strategies to Maximize Transfer of Learning

Unit III : Teacher and Teaching

  • Teacher: Qualities and Role in the Changing Scenario -- Transmitter of Knowledge, Model, Facilitator, Negotiator and Co-learner
  • Concept of Teaching , Principles and Maxims of Teaching, Teaching as a Profession: Meaning of Profession, Characteristics of a Profession, Professional Ethics for the Teachers, Role of Teacher Training in Developing Professionalism in Teachers Educators
  • Relationship between Teaching and Learning, Principles of effective Teaching and Learning, Diverse Teaching Strategies for Diverse Learner
  • Learning Styles of Learners and their Implications for the Teaching

Unit IV : Phases and Models of Teaching

  • Phases of Teaching: Pre-active, Interactive and Post Active. Operations involved in each.
  • Models of Teaching: Meaning, Need, Types and Elements of Model of Teaching, Basic Teaching Models (Glaser).
  • Concept Attainment Model (Bruner) and Advance Organiser Model (Ausbel), Problem Solving Teaching Model.
  • Strategies of Teaching: Brain Storming, Simulation, Role Play and Gaming, Factors affecting the process of Learning and Teaching.

Activities (Any one of the following)

  1. A study of educational, social & cultural functions of any informal agency of education.
  2. Prepare a report of educational problems of learners in any school.
  3. Prepare a report of problem of SC/ST/Backward/ Minority group of children in the rural & urban area of Himachal Pradesh.

Suggested Readings

Bower , G H and Hilgard E R (1981) Theories of learning, Englewood Cliffs,. New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc.

Chauhan S.S. ( 1995) Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.

Mangal S.K. 2005) Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi. Prentice Hall of India,

Dandapani S. (2005). Advanced Educational Psychology, New Delhi: Anmol Publications

Gagne R.M. (1985) ‘ The Conditions of Learning and Theory of Instruction,(IV Edition) New York, Holt: Rinehart and Winston.

Gardener, Howard (1989). Frames of Mind. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences, New York: Basic Books,

Hock, Elizabeth B.(2007). Child Development (6th Edition). New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill,

Lindgren H.C. (1980) ‘Educational Psychology in the Classroom, New York: Oxford University Press.

NCERT (2005) National Curriculum Framework, New Delhi.

NCTE (2009) National Curriculum Framework for Teacher Education, New Delhi.

Roy, S.(1994-95). Shiskha Monovidya, Kolkata: Soma Book Agency.

Santrock, John W. (2006). Educational Psychology Update: Preparing for PRAXIS TM and Practice (2nd edition), New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill.

Sarangapani M. Padma (2003), Constructing School Knowledge :An Ethnography of Learning in an Indian Village,New Delhi: Sage Publication.

Skinner C E, (1984) Educational Psychology New Delhi: Prentice Hall.

Vygotsky, L.S. (1978) Mind in Society, Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

Woolfolk, A.E. (2009). Educational Psychology (11th Edition) (My Education Lab Series) New Delhi: Prentice Hall.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Section A will consist of 8 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 16 marks. Sections B, C, D and E will have two long answer type questions from the respective Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the syllabus and carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B, C, D and E of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short questions should be completed in around 100 words each.


 

Paper VII

ASSESSMENT FOR LEARNING

Marks: 100 (80 + 20)

 

Course Objectives:

The student teachers will be able to:

1. Understand the nature of assessment and its role in teaching-learning process.

2. Understand the different perspectives of learning on assessment.

3. Realize the need for school based assessment.

4. Examine the contextual roles of different forms of assessment in schools.

5. Understand the different dimensions of learning and the related assessment procedures, tools and techniques.

6. Develop assessment tasks and tools to assess learners’ performance.

7. Analyze, manage and interpret assessment data.

8. Analyze the reporting procedures of learners’ performance in schools.

9. Develop indicators to assess learners’ performance on different types of tasks.

10. Examine the issues and concerns of assessment and evaluation practices in schools.

11. Understand the policy perspectives on examinations and assessment and their implementation practices.

12. Trace the technology-based assessment practices and other trends.

 

Unit 1: Perspectives on Assessment

  • Concept of measurement, assessment, evaluation and their interrelationship.

 

  • Purposes of Assessment: Prognostic, Monitoring of Learning, Providing Feedback, Selection, Promotion, Placement, Certification, Grading and Diagnostic

 

  • Classification of assessment: based on purpose (prognostic, formative, diagnostic and summative), scope (teacher made, standardized), nature of attribute measured (achievement, aptitude, attitude), nature of information gathered (qualitative, quantitative), mode of response (oral or written; selection or supply), nature of interpretation (norm-referenced, criterion-referenced) and assessment context (internal or external).

 

  • Need for continuous and comprehensive school-based assessment; Grading: Concept, Types and Application; Indicators for grading.

 

Unit 2: Assessment of Learning

  • Dimensions of learning: cognitive, affective and performance.
  • Assessment of cognitive learning: types and levels of cognitive learning: understanding and application; Thinking skills – convergent, divergent, critical, problem solving, decision making and procedures for their assessment.
  • Assessment of affective learning: Attitude, values, interests and procedures for their assessment.
  • Assessment of Performance: Tools and techniques for assessment of skills; Use of Projects, Assignments, Work sheets, Practical work, Performance based activities.

Unit 3: Planning, Executing, Interpreting and Reporting of Assessment

  • Difference between instructional, learning and assessment objectives; Stating of assessment objectives in behavioural terms.
  • Construction/selection of test items; Guidelines for construction of test items; Guidelines for administration and scoring; Preparation of blue-print; Performing item analysis.
  • Processing test performance: Calculation of percentages and central tendency measures; graphical representations; Analysis and interpretation of learners’ performance; Reporting learners’ performance – Progress reports, Cumulative records, Portfolios.
  • Means of providing remedial instruction for improving learning, Using feedback for reporting to different stakeholders – learners, parents and administrators; Use of feedback for teachers’ self-improvement.

Unit 4: Issues, Concerns and Trends in Learning Assessment

  • Existing Practices: Unit tests, half- yearly and annual examinations, semester system, Board examinations and Entrance tests, State and National achievement surveys, Use of question banks.
  • Issues and Problems: Marking Vs. Grading, Non-detention policy, Objectivity Vs. Subjectivity, Impact of entrance tests and public examination on teaching and learning – the menace of coaching
  • Policy perspectives on examinations and assessment: Recommendations of NPE, 1986 and NCF, 2005.
  • Trends in assessment and evaluation: Online examination, Peer assessment, Self-Assessment, Computer-based examinations and other technology-based assessment practices.

Activity (Any One of the Following):

1. Construct an achievement test in any subject of your interest containing a minimum of 50 items with its marking scheme and scoring procedure.

2. Visit an elementary school and prepare a report on the assessment and evaluation practices adopted by the school teachers.

3. Study the parameters / indicators followed in Continuous and Comprehensive Assessment System of CBSE and HP State Education Department. Prepare a critical report highlighting the similarities and differences in the two systems.

4. Visit a school and study how the progress reports and cumulative records of students are maintained by the teachers. Prepare a detailed report highlighting the content and format of students’ progress reports and cumulative records.

 

Suggested Readings:

Bransford, J., Brown, A.L., & Cocking, R.R. (Eds.) (2000). How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Burke, K. (2005). How to Assess Authentic Learning (4th Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin. Burke, K., Fogarty, R., & Belgrad, S (2002). The portfolio connection: Student work linked to standards (2nd Ed.) Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Carr, J.F., & Harris, D.E. (2001). Succeeding with Standards: Linking Curriculum, Assessment, and Action Planning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Danielson, C. (2002). Enhancing Student Achievement: A Framework for School Improvement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Gentile, J.R. & Lalley, J.P. (2003). Standards and Mastery Learning: Aligning Teaching and Assessment so all Children Can Learn. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Guskey, T.R., & Bailey, J.M. (2001). Developing Grading and Reporting Systems for Student Learning. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Linn, R.L. and Gronlund, N.E. (2003): Measurement and Evaluation in Teaching. Singapore: Pearson Education.

Nandra, Inder Dev Singh (2012). Learning Resources and Assessment of Learning. Patiala: 21st Century Publications.

Natrajan V. and Kulshreshta S.P. (1983). Assessing Non-Scholastic Aspects-Learners Behaviour, New Delhi: Association of Indian Universities.

NCERT(1985). Curriculum and Evaluation, New Delhi.

Newman, F.M. (1996). Authentic Achievement: Restructuring Schools for Intellectual Quality. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Nitko, A.J. (2001). Educational Assessment of Students (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Singh H.S.(1974). Modern Educational Testing, New Delhi: Sterling Publication.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of five sections: A, B, C, D and E. Section A will consist of 8 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 16 marks. Sections B, C, D and E will have two long answer type questions from the respective Units 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the syllabus & carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B, C, D and E of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short questions should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper VIII

DRAMA AND ART IN EDUCATION

 

Course objectives: Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

The student teachers will be able to:

  1. Understand the concept and importance of various arts in human life.
  2. Understand aims, objectives and principles of performing and visual arts.
  3. Appreciate Indian folk and visual and performing arts.
  4. Understand various methods and techniques of teaching creative arts.
  5. Understand the importance of visits in arts exhibitions and cultural festivals.

UNIT-I : Origin and Development of Art in India

1. Meaning of Art: Concept and Scope of Art.

2. Origin & development of Arts in India with special reference to the performing and visual arts.

3. Importance of various Arts in Life and Education.

4. Aims and objective of teaching performing and visual arts, Principles of Art.

UNIT-II : Methods and Approaches of Teaching Creative Arts

1. Understanding Indian folk and visual and performing arts.

2. Methods of teaching creative arts: a. Lecture cum Demonstration method. b. Direct Observation method. c. Method of Imagination and Free Expression.

3. Importance of visits in art exhibitions and cultural festivals.

4. Process of preparing canvas, Types of Colours and Paints.

Activity (Any one of the following):

Practical work to be submitted by students during the session: Size-½ Imperial Size Sheet. One Canvas in size 18’X 22’ to be submitted along with the sheets.

  1. Landscapes - 1
  2. Still life – 1
  3. Poster – 1

 

Suggested Readings

Brown, Percy (1953). Indian Painting, Calcutta.

Chawla, S.S. (1986). Teaching of Art. Patiala: Publication Bureau, Punjabi University.

Harriet, Goldstein (1964). Art in Everyday Life. Calcutta: Oxford and IBH Publishing Company.

Jaswani, K.K., Teaching and Appreciation of Art in Schools. Lowenfeld Viktor .

Creative and Mental Growth. Margaret, Marie Deneck (1976)

Indian Art. London: The Himalata Publication.

Sharma, L.C., History of Art, Meerut: Goel Publishing House. Read,

Herbert. Education through Art [paperback].

Shelar, Sanjay. Still Life. Jyotsna Prakashan.

 

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Section A will consist of 4 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 8 marks. Sections B and C will have two long answer type questions from the respective units 1 and 2 of the syllabus and will carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B and C of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short question should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper IX – A (i)

TEACHING OF PHYSICAL SCIENCES

Course objectives: Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

The student teachers will be able to:

  1. Familiarize with nature of physical science.
  2. Formulate instructional objectives in behavioural terms.
  3. Apply various approaches and methods of teaching physical science.
  4. Select and integrate various kinds of instructional media.

UNIT-I : Foundations of Physical Science

  • Meaning, Nature and Scope of Physical Science.
  • Aims And Objectives of Teaching Physical Science; Taxonomy of Educational Objectives; Writing Instructional Objectives in Behavioural Terms.
  • Importance of Physical Sciences as a Subject of the School Curriculum.
  • Brief life history of Eminent Indian Scientists and Their Contributions- C. V. Raman, J.C.Bose, Satyendranath Bose, Vikram sarabhai, Homi Jahangir Bhabha, A. P. J. Abdul Kalam.

 

UNIT-II : Curriculum, Methods and Approaches of Teaching Physical Sciences.

  • Curriculum in Physical Science: Meaning, Objectives, Principles and Steps of Curriculum Construction.
  • Process of Evaluation of Physical Science Curriculum at School Level.
  • Methods of Teaching Physical Science with Reference to Lecture, Lecture-Cum-Demonstration, Project Method, Problem Solving Approach, Laboratory, Heuristic and Inductive-Deductive Approach, CAI.
  • Activity Approaches and Non-Formal Methods of Teaching Physical Sciences in terms of Field Trips, Science Club, Science, Museum, Science Fairs.

Activity (Any one of the following)

  1. Preparation of a low cost and no cost teaching aids and studying their effectiveness a classroom transaction.
  2. Developing a unit plan of own choice.
  3. Prepare a report on critical analysis of physical sciences curriculum prescribed by HPBSE / CBSE for secondary school stage.

Suggested Readings:

Das, R.C. (1989): Science Teaching in Schools, New Delhi: Sterling Publishers..

Kohli, V.K. (1998): How to Teach Science, Ambala: Vivek Publishers,.

Kumar, Amit (2002): Teaching of Physical Sciences, New Delhi: Anmol Publications,.

Mangal, S.K. (1997): Teaching of Science, New Delhi: Arya Book Depot.

Mohan, Radha (2002): Innovative Physical Science Teaching Methods. New Delhi:

P.H.I.

Sharma, R.C. (1998): Modern Science of Teaching, New Delhi: Dhanpat Rai and Sons,.

Vaidya, Narendra (1996): Science of Teaching for 21st Century, New Delhi: Deep and Deep Publishers.

Kulshreshtha, R.P. (2010): Teaching of Physical Science. Meerut :R.Lall.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Section A will consist of 4 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 8 marks. Sections B and C will have two long answer type questions from the respective units 1 and 2 of the syllabus and will carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B and C of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short question should be completed in around 100 words each.

Paper IX – A (ii)

TEACHING OF LIFE SCIENCES

Course objectives: Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

The student teachers will be able to:

  1. Understand various objectives of teaching life sciences and to write the same in behavioural terms.
  2. Understand and apply various methods of teaching life sciences.
  3. Understand, analyze and improve present curriculum of life sciences operative at school level.
  4. Understand the importance and appropriate use of different audio visual aids and improvised apparatus in Indian conditions with reference to concepts to be taught.

Unit 1: Foundations of Teaching of Life Science

  • Meaning, nature and scope of Life Science, Historical development of Life Sciences in secondary school curriculum, Importance of Life Science in school curriculum.
  • Aims and Objectives of Teaching Life Sciences at secondary stage; Writing instructional Objectives in behavioural terms. Formulation and classification of Instructional Objectives for teaching of Life Sciences with reference to cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains.
  • Life Sciences Curriculum at School stage: concept, scope and principles of curriculum construction, approaches of curriculum construction such as concentric approach, topical approach and unit approach.
  • Process of Evaluation of Life Sciences Curriculum at School level (HPBSE and CBSE).

Unit 2: Teaching Methods, Approaches and Techniques

  • Teaching methods in Life Science: lecture method, lecture-cum demonstration method, project method, heuristic method, laboratory method.
  • Approaches in Life Science: Inductive-deductive approach, problem solving approach, computer assisted instructions and web based instructions.
  • Visualizing, Organizing and contextualizing learning situations through :
  1. Field Trips
  2. Biological Associations, Science Fairs and Exhibitions
  3. Botanical Garden
  4. Museum
  5. Aquarium and Vivarium
  6. Biological Clubs
  7. Science Excursions
  8. Concept Mapping
  • Facilitating Life Science Learning: issues in practice; collaborative learning, peer learning; dealing students in heterogeneous classes.

Activity (Any one of the Following)

The student teacher will perform the following experiments and record them in the practical journal/file:

  1. To prepare a temporary mount of a leaf peel to show stomata.
  2. To show experimentally that carbon dioxide is given out during respiration.

Prepare a report on critical analysis of life sciences curriculum prescribed by HPBSE / CBSE for secondary school stage.

Suggested Readings:

Bhandula, N. Chadha, Sharma, P.C.(1989): Teaching of Science, Ludhiana: Prakash Brothers,.

Gupta V.K.(1994): Life Science Education Today. Chandigarh: Arun Publishing House.

Kohli, V.K.(2006): How to Teach Science. Ambala : Vivek Publishers,.

Sharma R.C. (1998): Modern Science Teaching, New Delhi: Dhanpat Rai Publishers.

Sood, J.K.(1987): Teaching of Life Science. A Book of Methods. Chandigarh: Kohli Publishers.

Venkataish, S.(2002): Science Education in 21st century, New Delhi: Anmol Publications.

Yadav, K. :Teaching of Life Science, New Delhi :Anmol Publications,.

Mangal S.K.(2005): Teaching of Life Science India: Arya Publication,.

Sharma, P.(2007): Teaching of Life Science, New Delhi: APH Publishing Corporation.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PAPER-SETTER AND CANDIDATES

The question paper will consist of three sections: A, B and C. Section A will consist of 4 short answer type questions (2 marks each) which will cover the entire syllabus uniformly and carry 8 marks. Sections B and C will have two long answer type questions from the respective units 1 and 2 of the syllabus and will carry 16 marks each.

Candidates are required to attempt one question each from the sections B and C of the question paper and entire Section A. Answer to short question should be completed in around 60-65 words each.

Paper IX – A (iii)

TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS

 

Course objectives: Marks: 50 (40 + 10)

The student teachers will be able to:

  1. understand the nature and characteristics of Mathematics.
  2. know the importance and values of teaching mathematics.
  3. understand the relationship of mathematics with other subjects of school curriculum.
  4. understand aims and objectives of teaching mathematics at school stage.
  5. state objectives in behavioural terms with reference to concepts and generalizations.
  6. understand the contribution made by Indian and Western mathematician.
  7. app&am